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Torii Ema University

Constructed in 1928 underneath Azabu-Juban in a disused network of underground tunnels, it is one of the most secretive and yet prestigious Universities in Japan.

90% of the Expatriate population send their students there. It has ties to major international universities such as Harvard and Oxford and routinely exchanges students with them. It features an "Escalator" system where students of sufficient aptitide can protentially attend from preschool through post-grad. In reality, only a few manage this.


Originally it was named A*C Academy, but it was renamed to Torii Ema in 1975 after Sebastian Theodore von Klampp purchased the faciltities. Sometimes it it still called Torii Ema Academy, and the two names are used interchangably.

Physical Entrance to the school can only be had though undegound entrancess concealed under street level, usually near manhole covers, or via basement entryways in select other buildings in Juban. Detection systems and monitors are set up so students exiting can make sure upper roads are clear before ascending to street level.

The interior of the school is a sterile, gleaming white maze of corridors that use 80" 8k high definition televisions mounted in walls to substitute for windows and digital signage. An inattentive visitor might easily think they were aboveground as the screens usually project true-life imagery of the outside world above.



The school uniform is just a traffic-cone orange armband emblazed with the school logo in white. This allows students to express their individuality by wearing whatever clothes they would like.

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The logo itself is a white circle dominated by a stylized T*E that merged to look like a Japanese Shrine gate, the letters slanted to overlay a pentagram, with a pyramid above them emblazoned with a tiny all-seeing eye, intersected by the horns of a crescent moon.

Its occult symbology has been dismissed by most as a syncretic attempt to evoke a "cheap air of mystery" surrounding the school, but there are those who feel it has a deeper significance.